HomeThe CSWD BlogGeneral TopicsGreen Up Day: Vermont’s 47th annual labor of love

Green Up Day: Vermont’s 47th annual labor of love

A woman and two children helping to pick up trash along a Vermont roadside.
photo via UCSVT

Join your neighbors and hundreds of others from all around the state for Vermont’s annual labor of love on Saturday, May 6th for Green Up Day!

  • WHAT: 47th Annual Green Up Day
  • WHEN: Saturday, May 6th, 2017
  • WHERE: Your community
  • HOW: Click here to find out how to participate

We may be the Green Mountain State, but we’re also the green roadsides and riverways state! Show some love and spend a few hours helping your fellow Vermonters clean up a winter’s worth of trash. The green glow you feel will last a lot longer than the time you donate to the cause.

Green Up Vermont will supply the bags—you supply the pick-up-itude! It’s fun, you meet all kinds of great people, and you get that sweet glow from having taken part in something really big and wonderful.

How to take part

Each town has figured out the best way to organize Green Up Day crews. Some even throw a big party afterwards! Visit the Green Up Day participation page to find out what’s going on in your town.

Please remember: Recyclables must be clean & dry

If you want to recycle cans, bottles, paper, and cardboard found along the road, we can only accept them if they are clean and dry. That means no dirt and no residue of drink or food. Unfortunately, contaminated recyclables reduce the efficiency of our recycling system, and can contribute to lowering the amount we are paid for our materials, which means less funding for our recycling system.

Recycle right—and throw contaminated material in the trash. Thank you for your efforts!

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Clare
Clare
Clare has lived in Tennessee, New Mexico, California, Virginia, Connecticut, Texas, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and, for the past 10 years, Vermont. She can be found peering into recycling bins everywhere to see what works and is frequently quizzed about recycling and composting in random places when people find out where she works. She spends as much time as possible playing ukulele and roaming through Vermont’s spectacular mountains and forests.